by Max Barry

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The Arctic RMB

WA Delegate (non-executive): The Oppressed Peoples of Jong Un (elected )

Founder: The Christmas Polar Bear of Bilabao

Last WA Update:

Board Activity History Admin Rank

Largest Insurance Industry: 248th Largest Retail Industry: 254th Largest Soda Pop Sector: 277th+26
Most Corrupt Governments: 342nd Largest Black Market: 344th Most Avoided: 347th Largest Timber Woodchipping Industry: 354th Most Devout: 363rd Largest Mining Sector: 369th Highest Unexpected Death Rate: 378th Most Politically Apathetic Citizens: 380th Fattest Citizens: 440th Highest Wealthy Incomes: 461st Highest Economic Output: 719th Highest Disposable Incomes: 732nd Most Advanced Law Enforcement: 863rd Highest Average Incomes: 868th Most Valuable International Artwork: 915th Most World Assembly Endorsements: 942nd Most Subsidized Industry: 1,084th Largest Populations: 1,139th Largest Information Technology Sector: 1,189th Largest Manufacturing Sector: 1,198th Nudest: 1,201st Most Influential: 1,262nd Largest Arms Manufacturing Sector: 1,294th Lowest Crime Rates: 1,404th Most Advanced Defense Forces: 1,497th Most Scientifically Advanced: 1,675th
World Factbook Entry


---Welcome to THE ARCTIC---
At 90 degrees latitude all directions are south.
LinkThe Arctic is a vast, ice-covered ocean, surrounded by tree-less, frozen ground, that teems with life, including organisms living in the ice, fish and marine mammals, birds, land animals and human societies.


... *'* .
:*_\ /_*: . . . We were the featured region on January 28, 2017.
.:*./ \.*:
. .* , *

Now playing on The Arctic radio station, K-ICY: . LinkOrchestre de Chambre Jean-François Paillard ~ LinkPachebel Canon in D


Embassies: Arctic, Christmas, and The EverLit Torch.

Tags: Casual, Eco-Friendly, Featured, and Small.

The Arctic contains 7 nations, the 2,400th most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Least Corrupt Governments in The Arctic

World Census agents tempted government officials with financial and other inducements to bend the rules and recorded how often their proposals were declined.

As a region, The Arctic is ranked 22,675th in the world for Least Corrupt Governments.

NationWA CategoryMotto
1.The Fleet Feet of The nationstates fleaLiberal Democratic Socialists Open-Minded Education State“Hop. Hop. Hop.”
2.The Christmas Polar Bear of BilabaoIron Fist Socialists Equality and Tolerance Society“Adventure is just bad planning”
3.The Protectorate of WalrussusPsychotic Dictatorship Fascist Dictatorship“Cold enough for ya?”
4.The Meteorological Office of VandrelInoffensive Centrist Democracy Fascists“Ambassador from Arctic”
5.The Holy Catgirl Empire of Making Catgirls RealFather Knows Best State Suspiciously Conservative Democracy“We WILL make catgirls REAL!”
6.The Oppressed Peoples of Jong UnIron Fist Consumerists Imperialist Pig Dog Oppressors“With The Regime Or Die!!!”
7.The Corporate Theocracy of The Merry ChristmasCorporate Police State Halliburton“Santa is Watching”

Regional Happenings

More...

The Arctic Regional Message Board

Hi Walrussus. How were your travels?

The nationstates flea wrote:Hi Walrussus. How were your travels?

Heya! They where good, just doing some puppet work representing in some other places, but decided to come back here

The 7 day weather forecast summary for The Arctic:

Reviewing the forecast for The Arctic Over the next 7 days and the average daytime maximum temperature will be around 1°C, with a high for the week of 4°C expected on the afternoon of Wednesday 17th. The mean minimum temperature will be 0°C, dipping to its lowest on the afternoon of Tuesday 16th at -2°C. The coming week will have most days seeing a little rain, sleet or snow. Current predictions suggest Monday 15th will have the most precipitation with an accumulation of around 5.0mm. On the whole winds are likely to be moderate.

How are you all? Unfortunately the weather forecast is not available this week due to an unsecured connection apparently.

Anyway official advice is that you should all still stay at home.

2020 June Sea Ice Outlook Report is Now Available

The 2020 June Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) report is now available. The Sea Ice Outlook, an effort managed by the Sea Ice Prediction Network–Phase 2 (SIPN2), provides an open process for those interested in Arctic sea ice to share predictions and ideas. The monthly reports contain a variety of perspectives—from advanced numerical models to qualitative perspectives from citizen scientists. The Outlook is not an operational forecast.

For the 2020 June report, 33 contributions were received that included pan-Arctic predictions. Of those contributions eight included predictions for pan-Antarctic and the Alaska Region. Additionally, we received 13 submissions of sea-ice probability and ten submissions of first ice-free date. New this year, the report includes ice-free conditions for the Hudson Bay region; September sea-ice concentration contour in the Fram Strait region, motivated by the MOSAiC expedition; and we invited contributors to submit initial conditions (sea-ice concentration and sea-ice thickness) of their forecasts to better understand how observations are being used in forecasts.

For the pan-Arctic, the median June Outlook value for September 2020 sea-ice extent is 4.33 million square kilometers, with quartiles of 4.06 and 4.59 million square kilometers. The median is close to the 2019 June Outlook, of 4.40 million square kilometers, and to the observed 2019 September sea-ice extent of 4.32 million square kilometers.

Walrussus wrote:Heya! They where good, just doing some puppet work representing in some other places, but decided to come back here

We're happy to sea you. lol

Vandrel wrote:How are you all? Unfortunately the weather forecast is not available this week due to an unsecured connection apparently.

Anyway official advice is that you should all still stay at home.

*echo* How are you all --- you all --you all. *echo*
Since infection/death rates are currently low I am not looking forward to reopening.

Vandrel wrote: 2020 June Sea Ice Outlook Report is Now Available

The 2020 June Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) report is now available. The Sea Ice Outlook, an effort managed by the Sea Ice Prediction Network–Phase 2 (SIPN2), provides an open process for those interested in Arctic sea ice to share predictions and ideas. The monthly reports contain a variety of perspectives—from advanced numerical models to qualitative perspectives from citizen scientists. The Outlook is not an operational forecast.

For the 2020 June report, 33 contributions were received that included pan-Arctic predictions. Of those contributions eight included predictions for pan-Antarctic and the Alaska Region. Additionally, we received 13 submissions of sea-ice probability and ten submissions of first ice-free date. New this year, the report includes ice-free conditions for the Hudson Bay region; September sea-ice concentration contour in the Fram Strait region, motivated by the MOSAiC expedition; and we invited contributors to submit initial conditions (sea-ice concentration and sea-ice thickness) of their forecasts to better understand how observations are being used in forecasts.

For the pan-Arctic, the median June Outlook value for September 2020 sea-ice extent is 4.33 million square kilometers, with quartiles of 4.06 and 4.59 million square kilometers. The median is close to the 2019 June Outlook, of 4.40 million square kilometers, and to the observed 2019 September sea-ice extent of 4.32 million square kilometers.

Oh, how splendid! The cartographic institute will be in touch and carefully consider these data for charts to come. And if SPIN2 could benefit from a flashy ad campaign and line of merchandise, I know the people to make it happen.

The 7 day weather forecast summary for The Arctic:

Taking a look at The Arctic over the coming week and the average daytime maximum temperature will be around 5°C/41F, with a high for the week of 7°C/44·6F expected on the afternoon of Saturday 4th. The average minimum temperature will be 1°C/33·8F, dipping to its lowest on the morning of Wednesday 8th at 0°C/32F. Expect the week ahead to remain predominantly dry. On the whole winds are likely to be moderate.

On May 29th, outside Norilsk, Siberia, the northernmost city in the world, the thawing ground buckled, causing an oil-storage tank to collapse and spew more than a hundred and fifty thousand barrels, or twenty-one thousand tons, of diesel fuel into the Ambarnaya River. The spill was the largest to ever occur in the Russian Arctic. . . . The last time the town made the news, before the oil spill, was exactly a year ago, when an emaciated polar bear, a refugee from its melting home, was photographed rummaging through the city dump. . . .

The remote Siberian town of Verkhoyansk, three thousand miles east of Moscow and six miles north of the Arctic Circle, has long held the record, with another Siberian town, for the coldest inhabited place in the world. The record was set in 1892, when the temperature dropped to ninety below zero Fahrenheit, although these days winter temperatures are noticeably milder, hovering around fifty below. On Jun 20th, Verkhoyansk claimed a new record: the hottest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic, with an observation of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit—the same temperature was recorded that day in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. . . . The permafrost found in the area surrounding Verkhoyansk is some of the deepest and oldest in the world, descending as much as five thousand feet. Closer to the surface, a type of ice-rich permafrost known as yedoma is particularly vulnerable to rapid thaws. The result is thermokarst, the strange and sometimes shocking topography that forms as the land slides, sags, and sinks. Mysterious sinkholes suddenly appear, drunken forests fall, and hillocks destroy farmland. One of Russia’s most extreme examples of thermokarst, known as the Batagay megaslump, is a two-hundred-and-eighty-foot-deep, half-mile-wide depression, situated just outside Verkhoyansk. It first began forming as a small gully in the nineteen-sixties, because of deforestation, but has grown significantly in recent years, exposing the remains of ancient creatures, including musk ox, a cave lion, a Pleistocene wolf, a woolly mammoth, . . .

Excerpt from: The New Yorker https://www.newyorker.com/news/annals-of-a-warming-planet/a-disastrous-summer-in-the-arctic

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